'Rocket League' loot box drop rate published for the first time

Psyonix breaks down their drop rate in a moment of transparency that other developers should take note of.

As loot boxes are phased out of Middle-earth: Shadow of War, Rocket League developer, Psyonix, has given players an idea of what the drop rate percentage looks like for their loot boxes. According to the Rocket League blog, there are big changes incoming for the zany car-soccer game, and they wanted to give their players an idea of what to expect before the “revamped progression system” and Rocket Pass (similar to Fortnite’s Battle Pass, it seems) were introduced.

  • Rare Item: 55%
  • Very Rare Item: 28%
  • Import Item: 12%
  • Exotic Item: 4%
  • Black Market Item: 1%
  • Chance of receiving Painted attribute: 25%
  • Chance of receiving Certified attribute: 25%

Psyonix noted that the “drop rates have been the same since our Crates and Keys system launched in September 2016. Every Crate and Crate Series in Rocket League are subject to these rates, whether it was the retired Champions Series Crates or the next Crate we’re releasing later this summer.”

Overwatch had to release its drop rate numbers in China last year, but they haven’t published those numbers outside of the Chinese market. Mic reported that the breakdown came down to 1 epic item per 5.5 loot boxes and 1 legendary item per 13.5 loot boxes, which is about an 18 percent chance for an epic and a 7 percent chance for a legendary in any given loot box (at least in China).

This kind of transparency is heartening, especially since many loot box systems obfuscate their numbers, creating quite a bit of distrust between the developer and the player, especially when the drop rate feels unfair. It’s even worse when the loot boxes drop in-game items that are tied to player progression (like Battlefront 2 was planning prior to launch). Thankfully, Rocket League is among the majority in that its loot boxes only contain cosmetic items that don’t affect gameplay at all. If more developers were transparent about their loot box drop rates, there might not be as much of a backlash when they find their way into other multiplayer games in the future.

Managing Editor

Amanda has been meandering around the game journosphere since 2010, mostly covering indie games, culture, and industry news. These days, she talks about the business of making games through a critical cultural lens. She adores RPGs, weird narrative indie games, and strategy games that take forever to learn. Amanda is also the managing editor of SuperParent. You can find her on Twitter as @AmandaFarough or you can email her at amanda.farough@gamedaily.biz.