The Buzz: Studios reach out to former Telltale staff; fans react to their favorite Telltale memories

It's been a tough go for former Telltale employees. The industry has rallied in support of both the former staff members and the stories they told with their games.

On September 21, Telltale Games entered into a "majority studio closure," leaving approximately 250 people (90 percent of the staff) without a job, without severance, and without a final paycheck. To the surprise of some (but not all), the industry has rallied around a couple of relevant hashtags: #telltalejobs and #telltalememories. The former is all about getting gainful employment for the people affected by the studio's (potentially illegal) mass layoffs and the latter has given fans and industry creatives the chance to share stories about what Telltale has meant to them.

GameDaily's continued coverage of Telltale Games' studio woes can be found here

#telltalejobs

It started with narrative designer, Emily Grace Buck, and her call to action.

It goes on and on and on. Usually after studio closures, it's a lot of "thoughts and prayers" and "that's so sad" but it's heartening to see the industry pull together so quickly (and profoundly) after Telltale's mass layoffs in the most expensive region in the United States.

#telltalememories

There's a lot of uncertainty about the future of Telltale Games and management is keeping quiet in the worst way. But between them pulling sales for The Walking Dead: The Final Season from major platforms, the WARN act lawsuit filing, and the 250+ people who are without medical insurance, severance, or final pay... it's grim. Holding onto the bright beacons of light that the industry has been pouring out since the layoffs became reality is one way that we can remember the best parts of Telltale: the games and the people who made them. 

Managing Editor

Amanda has been meandering around the game journosphere since 2010, mostly covering indie games, culture, and industry news. These days, she talks about the business of making games through a critical cultural lens. She adores RPGs, weird narrative indie games, and strategy games that take forever to learn. Amanda is also the managing editor of SuperParent. You can find her on Twitter as @AmandaFarough or you can email her at amanda.farough@gamedaily.biz.